Quantcast

Dr. Campbell: When you should fire your doctor - Greenville, NC | News | Weather | Sports - WNCT.com

WNCN News

Dr. Kevin Campbell: When you should fire your doctor

Posted: Updated:
Dr. Kevin Campbell Dr. Kevin Campbell
RALEIGH, N.C. -

Just as in marriage, the ability to communicate is essential to any successful doctor-patient relationship.

In fact, the most successful doctor-patient relationships are a lot like a marriage.  Both parties must be willing to listen, to negotiate and to support each other's decisions.  As I have stated in many previous blogs, outcomes improve significantly when patients are engaged in their own healthcare.  Engagement only occurs when doctors and patients are able to effectively work together to solve health problems.  The days of the paternalistic physician dictating lifestyle changes and treatment plans are long over.  Today, patients are better informed and armed with information as they enter the office for consultation.

Unfortunately, just as in marriage, not all doctor-patient relationships work out.  Sometimes changes have to be made in the spirit of moving forward with effective healthcare. This week in the Wall Street Journal, author Kristen Gerencher addressed the issue of "When to fire your Doctor."  In this piece, Ms. Gerencher provides sound advice on how to determine when it is time for a change.  She mentions five warning signs that may indicate that a divorce and remarriage to another provider is important.  In particular, if you feel worse when you leave your physician's office than when you arrived, it may be time to consider a change.

Here's my take on the warning signs that the WSJ mentions:  (the warning signs listed are directly from the WSJ article, the commentary below each one is mine)

1. You leave with more questions than answers.  

It is critical that physicians take the time to communicate clearly to patients.  Essential to this communication is allowing time for questions AND clarifying any misunderstandings or addressing concerns about a treatment plan.  This can be challenging for doctors in the current healthcare environment where federally mandated documentation requirements and pressures to see more patients in less time are limiting the time once dedicated to patient discussion.  However, it is essential to the health of the doctor patient relationship that physicians do not allow these conversations to be pushed aside.  Remember, patient engagement is key.  An informed patient is much more likely to be engaged.

2. Your doctor dismisses your input.

In the age of the internet, patients often come armed with lots of information (lots of which is unreliable and shady at best) that is obtained from online searches.  Rather than simply dismiss the information as junk, it is important to guide our patients to more reliable and more accurate sources of internet information such as MedPage Today and other good patient friendly information sites.

3. Your doctor has misdiagnosed you.

Medicine is not a perfect science.  It is important that you work with your doctor every step of the way along your path to diagnosis.  Mistakes in diagnosis happen–however, these mistakes are not always negligence.  Consider if your physician has carefully considered your problem and has provided a well thought out differential diagnosis before leaving due to a misdiagnosis.  It is important that communication continues during the process of misdiagnosis.  If there is no good communication at this stage, it may be time to choose another provider.

4. Your doctor balks at a second opinion

A good physician is never afraid of a second opinion.  In fact, I often welcome a second opinion in cases where there are multiple choices of a plan of action.  It is essential that patients feel comfortable with their treatment plan–a feeling of comfort breeds engagement and engagement is key for success.  As physicians, we must be willing to put our egos aside in order to provide the best possible care for our patients.

5. Your doctor isn't board certified.

When choosing a physician, it is vital that you examine his or her background and training.  Typically, doctors must complete a course of training in residency and fellowship in order to be boarded in a particular specialty.  Board exams (some written and some oral) must be passed and competency must be proven.  Once certified, physicians must maintain competency through continuing medical education and re-certification every 10 years.  If your doctor is not board certified, it is not necessarily the end–ask why.  There are several reasons that they may not be including overseas training that is not recognized in the US by the US societies responsible for board certification.

Choosing a doctor is a lot like choosing a spouse.  Decisions should be made in cooperation with one another and both sides must contribute to planning and execution of the chosen course of action.  Patients must weigh options, consider pros and cons and discuss issues with their provider and the provider's staff when unhappy with a particular physician or physician group.  IF communication is not productive and there is no engagement, patients must make a change.  Good healthcare is a two way street.  Doctor and patient must work in concert in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

  • Health with Dr. CampbellMore>>

  • Dr. Campbell - New study suggests that we can delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease

    Dr. Campbell - New study suggests that we can delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease

    Wednesday, July 23 2014 5:00 AM EDT2014-07-23 09:00:23 GMT
    Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that can be quite devastating to both patient and families. Today in the U.S., more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease and it is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.
    Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that can be quite devastating to both patient and families. Today in the U.S., more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease and it is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • Dr. Campbell: Can sitting at your desk cancel out the benefits of exercise?

    Dr. Campbell: Can sitting at your desk cancel out the benefits of exercise?

    Tuesday, July 22 2014 10:08 AM EDT2014-07-22 14:08:09 GMT
    There is now evidence that time spent at your desk may actually reverse the benefits that you have obtained from that quick pre-work trip to the gym or a run or walk during your lunch break.
    There is now evidence that time spent at your desk may actually reverse the benefits that you have obtained from that quick pre-work trip to the gym or a run or walk during your lunch break.
  • Dr. Campbell: EKG screening of high school athletes

    Dr. Campbell: EKG screening of high school athletes

    Friday, July 11 2014 5:00 AM EDT2014-07-11 09:00:23 GMT
    When a seemingly healthy young athlete suddenly drops dead while playing sports, it's tragic and hard to accept. Some estimate that nearly 100 young athletes die every year in the U.S. from a preventable sudden cardiac arrest—if their underlying disorder had been previously identified.
    When a seemingly healthy young athlete suddenly drops dead while playing sports, it's tragic and hard to accept. Some estimate that nearly 100 young athletes die every year in the U.S. from a preventable sudden cardiac arrest—if their underlying disorder had been previously identified.
  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • 2 charged with first-degree murder in beating death of UNC professor, cancer researcher

    2 charged with first-degree murder in beating death of UNC professor, cancer researcher

    Friday, July 25 2014 9:00 AM EDT2014-07-25 13:00:14 GMT
    A UNC research professor was robbed and beaten to death Wednesday afternoon on University Drive in Chapel Hill, police said.
    A UNC research professor was robbed and beaten to death Wednesday afternoon on University Drive in Chapel Hill, police said.
  • Man charged with killing UNC professor had just left Wake Jail

    Man charged with killing UNC professor had just left Wake Jail

    Friday, July 25 2014 4:34 PM EDT2014-07-25 20:34:36 GMT
    Derick Davis II, 23 (Left) and Troy Arrington, Jr., 27, (Right)Derick Davis II, 23 (Left) and Troy Arrington, Jr., 27, (Right)
    An Orange County dispatcher sounded shocked Wednesday afternoon when a 911 caller described finding University of North Carolina professor Feng Liu beaten and dying on a street near the UNC campus.
    An Orange County dispatcher sounded shocked Wednesday afternoon when a 911 caller described finding University of North Carolina professor Feng Liu beaten and dying on a street near the UNC campus.
  • DOT fixes sign for new 485 flyover that spelled Pineville wrong

    DOT fixes sign for new 485 flyover that spelled Pineville wrong

    Friday, July 25 2014 1:40 PM EDT2014-07-25 17:40:30 GMT
    Thursday morning the Department of Transportation officially opened a ramp from Johnston Road to I-485. The flyover ramp opened around 5:15 a.m.
    Thursday morning the Department of Transportation officially opened a ramp from Johnston Road to I-485. The flyover ramp opened around 5:15 a.m.
Powered by WorldNow

3221 South Evans Street
Greenville N.C. 27834

Telephone: 252.355.8500
Fax: 252.355.8568
Email: newsdesk@wnct.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.