Quantcast

UNC weighs more out-of-staters at minority schools - Greenville, NC | News | Weather | Sports - WNCT.com

UNC weighs more out-of-staters at minority schools

Posted: Updated:
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -

Supervisors of North Carolina's state university system are discussing whether to counter falling enrollment at six campuses that historically served primarily black and American Indian students by allowing them to recruit more students from outside the state.
    
The University of North Carolina's Board of Governors on Thursday heard a staff recommendation to allow up to 30 percent of newly enrolled students at the six schools to come from outside the state. Enrollment of non-North Carolina freshmen is now limited to 18 percent at the public universities. A year ago, 14 percent of the nearly 32,000 new freshmen were from out-of- state.
    
The discussion came two days after UNC System President Tom Ross warned faculty and staff at Elizabeth City State University of "hard decisions" ahead as the school faces a $5 million budget shortfall this year. Enrollment fell to under 2,900, costing the school about $1.5 million, UNC budget figures showed. ECSU's enrollment this fall slid to just over 2,400 students, interim Chancellor Charles Becton said.
    
ECSU, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State University, and UNC-Pembroke all saw revenues from enrollment and related state funding drop by more than $1 million last year, university officials said. All but NCCU projected further drops this year. All were established to train black students except UNC-Pembroke, which was created to serve nearby American Indian residents.
    
A decision is months away on the proposed five-year experiment to raise non-resident enrollment. The proposal includes keeping constant the number of North Carolina students as the campuses try to rebuild enrollment with more out-of-staters. Besides filling empty classroom seats and stabilizing campus budgets, the campuses would become more efficient as measured by spending per degree earned, said Jonathan Pruitt, a UNC system vice president for finance.
    
Another advantage is that almost half the out-of-state students who attend the six campuses stay in North Carolina after graduation, boosting the economy, Ross said.
    
"There is an economic benefit to North Carolina by attracting talent that stays here," he said.
    
The extra revenue generated by attracting more non-resident students and charging them higher out-of-state rates wouldn't generate loads of extra money for individual campuses, Ross said. The revenue goes to the state's treasury, with some of the money coming back to the university to match teaching costs, he said.
    
Undergraduate tuition at Elizabeth City State this year is $2,776, while non-residents pay $13,633. At UNC-Pembroke, where only 3 percent of new undergraduates are from outside North Carolina, resident undergraduates pay $3,211 for tuition, while non-residents pay $12,418.
    
Previous discussions of expanding out-of-state enrollment have been criticized by both the public and political leaders, and the board's discussion Thursday showed any decision can't squeeze out opportunities for resident students to enroll.
    
"We've got a lot of people that's moved into this state. We've got a lot of capacity that's here with kids that want to go to school," Frank Grainger of Cary said. "We've got to fill up our universities with North Carolina students as much as we can."
  

  • Back To SchoolMore>>

  • NC has stiff penalties for passing stopped school bus

    NC has stiff penalties for passing stopped school bus

    Friday, August 22 2014 10:36 AM EDT2014-08-22 14:36:56 GMT
    Thousands of motorists pass stopped school buses every day, and many of them may not even realize they are breaking the law. It's an issue that has received intense attention in North Carolina, with 13 children being hit, and killed, at bus stops since 1999. One survey on March 26 of this year recorded 429 times where a driver roared past a stopped school bus in Wake County alone. In Durham County, there were 89 violations that same day and Cumberland County had a whopping 210. Johnston Coun...
    Thousands of motorists pass stopped school buses every day, and many of them may not even realize they are breaking the law. It's an issue that has received intense attention in North Carolina, with 13 children being hit, and killed, at bus stops since 1999. One survey on March 26 of this year recorded 429 times where a driver roared past a stopped school bus in Wake County alone. In Durham County, there were 89 violations that same day and Cumberland County had a whopping 210. Johnston Coun...
  • 'Active shooter' drill to take place at Ligon Middle in Raleigh

    'Active shooter' drill to take place at Ligon Middle in Raleigh

    Friday, August 22 2014 10:29 AM EDT2014-08-22 14:29:39 GMT
    File photoFile photo
    The Wake County Sheriff's Office will hold an “active shooter” training exercise at Ligon GT Magnet School Friday morning.
    The Wake County Sheriff's Office will hold an “active shooter” training exercise at Ligon GT Magnet School Friday morning.
  • Dr. Campbell: The role of vaccines in school

    Dr. Campbell: The role of vaccines in school

    Friday, August 22 2014 9:28 AM EDT2014-08-22 13:28:00 GMT
    Infectious diseases account for millions of school days lost each year for kindergarten through 12th-grade public school students in the United States. Forty percent of children aged five to 17 years missed three or more school days in the past year because of illness or injury.
    Infectious diseases account for millions of school days lost each year for kindergarten through 12th-grade public school students in the United States. Forty percent of children aged five to 17 years missed three or more school days in the past year because of illness or injury.
Powered by WorldNow

3221 South Evans Street
Greenville N.C. 27834

Telephone: 252.355.8500
Fax: 252.355.8568
Email: newsdesk@wnct.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.