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Refuge plans more barbed wire for wild horses - Greenville, NC | News | Weather | Sports - WNCT.com

Refuge plans more barbed wire for wild horses

COROLLA, N.C. - The Currituck National Wildlife Refuge says it plans to string more than 15,000 feet of barbed wire fence to keep wild horses from grazing where wildlife feed.

The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk reports (http://bit.ly/15XNyBa) that federal officials have requested bids to extend fencing in the 4,500-acre refuge from the dunes to the marsh. The move would effectively block the herd's access to a large section of the refuge. Bids are due this week.

More than 100 acres already are enclosed by an electric fence. The barbed wire fence would extend the barrier from ocean to sound.

Karen McCalpin, director of the Corolla Wild Horse Fund, said barbed wire is dangerous to wild horses and deer. She said a cut from rusty barbed wire can get infected or cause tetanus.

Information from: The Virginian-Pilot, http://pilotonline.com

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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