Can hearing music in the womb boost babies' brain development? - WNCT

Can hearing music in the womb boost babies' brain development?

Updated: Oct 31, 2013 11:28 AM
© Thinkstock / Comstock / Thinkstock © Thinkstock / Comstock / Thinkstock
  • HealthMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Playing music for babies while they are still in the womb could boost their brain development, a new study suggests.

Finnish researchers reported the findings Oct. 30 in the journal PLoS One.

"Even though we've previously shown that fetuses could learn minor details of speech, we did not know how long they could retain the information," study author Eino Partanen, from the University of Helsinki, said in a journal news release. "These results show that babies are capable of learning at a very young age, and that the effects of the learning remain apparent in the brain for a long time."

In conducting the study, the researchers asked women in their third trimester of pregnancy to play "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" at least five times per week. Meanwhile, a separate group of women did not play any music during their final trimester.

Shortly after birth, the researchers measured the infants' brain activity when they listened to "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" as well as a similar tune with some different notes in it, to determine if any learning had taken place. They repeated this assessment when the babies were 4 months old.

They found that when infants heard the song before birth, their brain activity was much stronger when they heard the original song than when they heard the modified version. The effect was still present when the babies were 4 months old.

The researchers said the period between the 27th week of pregnancy and six months after a baby is born is critical to the development of the auditory system.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

3221 South Evans Street
Greenville N.C. 27834

Telephone: 252.355.8500
Fax: 252.355.8568
Email: newsdesk@wnct.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.