Online Originals: The cost of climate change

Online Originals

(WNCT) Extreme weather events have increased in intensity and frequency in the past few decades, and scientists say humans have had a huge hand in causing the change. As severe weather ramps up, so do the costs.

First, the monetary costs.

In a study published by the National Bureau of Economics, increases in the average global temperature reduces GDP per capita.

Extreme events influence economic growth when the temperatures rise too high or below the norm, causing society to address the immediate effects (such as flooding) instead of investing in other areas of the economy.

By the turn of the century, the US will spend hundreds of billions of dollars on expenses caused by severe weather.

The cost of climate change

Water shortages, health costs associated with pollution, and damaged infrastructure are just a few examples of what government agencies will have to budget for over the next century.

Another cost is the rising inequality and mortality rate in the US.

Researchers predict mortality will increase by 5.4 deaths per 100,000 people for every one degree Celsius rise in temperature.

Other expected impacts include more mosquitoes carrying the West Nile virus, increased temperatures of streams and lakes, which will reduce oxygen levels and harm water quality.

First Alert Meteorologist Zoe Mintz says to be prepared for just about anything this hurricane season.

We don’t know what the future holds, and that’s the scary thing, it could increase by tenfold it could increase by two-fold.  

Zoe Mintz, First Alert Meteorologist

Your regular storm preparations also might need to change along with the increase in climate change.

That’s because areas that aren’t impacted by severe weather events like hurricanes will start experiencing those effects.

There were areas completely under water, that had never seen that kind of flooding before, there were whole entire areas that had to be evacuated that if you didn’t leave, you would have unfortunately died.  

There were areas completely underwater, that had never seen that kind of flooding before, there were whole entire areas that had to be evacuated that if you didn’t leave, you would have unfortunately died.  

Zoe Mintz, First Alert Meteorologist

And sometimes, preparation is just not enough. Packing up and leaving could be the only way to survive extreme weather.

If they tell you to get out, get out. It’s all you can do, listen to the national weather service. 

Zoe Mintz, First Alert Meteorologist

If you’re interested in learning more about climate change – check out Zoe Mintz video post on why the artic is getting hotter in comparison to the rest of the world.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

LKQD Outstream

Trending Stories

news-app-download-apple-350x50news-app-download-android-350x50