How the Black Lives Matter generation remembers John Lewis

Top News
John Lewis

In this June 7, 2020 photo provided by the Executive Office of District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser, John Lewis looks over a section of 16th Street that’s been renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington. The Washington Monument and the White House are visible in the distance. Lewis, a lion of the civil rights movement whose bloody beating by Alabama state troopers in 1965 helped galvanize opposition to racial segregation, and who went on to a long and celebrated career in Congress, died. He was 80. (Khalid Naji-Allah/Executive Office of the Mayor via AP)

Of all the ways that John Lewis influenced American life and politics, his indelible impact on young people may be among the most enduring. From student activist to elder statesman, Lewis continually encouraged the nation’s youth to start “good trouble.” And he modeled just how to do that. For the Black Lives Matter generation, the connection to Lewis, who died Friday, is deep.

Several Black activists tell The Associated Press that Lewis was generous with his time, taking meetings and sharing stages with younger movement figures. One activist said: “He didn’t have to stand with us, he chose to.”

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

LKQD Outstream

Trending Stories

news-app-download-apple-350x50news-app-download-android-350x50